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Homer: Odyssey VI and VII (Bristol Classical Press Greek Texts) (Bk. VI and VII)

Homer: Odyssey VI and VII (Bristol Classical Press Greek Texts) (Bk. VI and VII)

These two books of the "Odyssey" provide an ideal introduction to the poem, illustrating Odysseus' cunning intelligence at its best as he gains acceptance in the court of the Phaeacians, and, above all, the subtly drawn character of Nausicaa. This edition replaces the much used one by G.M. Edwards (1914). It contains text (now unexpurgated) and vocabulary, expanded commentary and new introduction. It is geared very much to the needs of those coming to Homer for the first time with a grasp of the basics of classical Greek, and assumes no previous knowledge of Homeric forms or grammar; an outline of these, and of the Homeric hexameter, is given in the introduction and grammar points are reiterated in the commentary. The introduction also provides an outline of questions surrounding Homer and the composition of the "Iliad" and "Odyssey", together with a discussion of the role of books 6 and 7 within the epic's overall structure.

Brand: Bristol Classical Press

Homer: Odyssey: XIII-XXIV (Bks. 13-24)

Homer: Odyssey: XIII-XXIV (Bks. 13-24)

First published in the outstanding and long-running 'red Macmillan' series in 1948 and revised in 1958 and 1962 (with, for example, a new section on Mycenaean Greek in relation to Homer), This second volume on the Odyssey has remained the standard edition used by upper school and university students to guide their early reading of the epic. The introduction covers many of the questions that lie behind the poem, and includes a useful summary of Homeric grammar; the text is elucidated with full annotations, indexes and bibliography. Also available: Odyssey I-XII

Brand: Bristol Classical Press

Black Odysseys: The Homeric Odyssey in the African Diaspora since 1939 (Classical Presences)

Black Odysseys: The Homeric Odyssey in the African Diaspora since 1939 (Classical Presences)

Black Odysseys explores creative works by artists of ultimately African descent, which respond to the Homeric Odyssey. Considering what the ancient Greek epic has signified for those struggling to emerge from the shadow of Western imperialism, and how it has inspired anti-colonial poets, novelists, playwrights, and directors, McConnell examines twentieth- and twenty-first century works from Africa and the African diaspora, including the Caribbean and the United States. In seeking to discover why the Odyssey, as a founding text of the Western canon, has been of such interest to these artists, the great plurality of post-colonial and anti-colonial responses becomes clear: responses that differ dramatically from each other, even in the attitude adopted towards Odysseus himself. Since Aime Cesaire's seminal 1939 poem, Cahier d'un retour au pays natal ( Notebook of a Return to My Native Land ), the Odyssey 's homecoming trope and quest for identity have inspired writers who are simultaneously striving against and appropriating the very forms which had been used to oppress them. Following in the wake of Cesaire, this volume proceeds chronologically and considers works by Ralph Ellison, Derek Walcott, Jon Amiel, Wilson Harris, Njabulo Ndebele, and Jatinder Verma.

Brand: Oxford University Press

Homer: Odyssey I-XII (Bks.1-12) (Greek Edition)

Homer: Odyssey I-XII (Bks.1-12) (Greek Edition)

First published in the outstanding and long-running 'red Macmillan' series in 1947 and substantially updated in 1959 (with, for example, sections on the relationship between Homer and the Mycenaean world), Stanford's Odyssey - of which this is the first of two volumes - has remained the standard edition used in upper school and by university students to guide their early reading of Homer. A substantial introduction covers many of the questions that lie behind the poem, including a thorough summary of Homeric grammar; the text is elucidated with full annotations, indexes and bibliography.

Brand: Bristol Classical Press

Homer: Odyssey Books XIX and XX (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

Homer: Odyssey Books XIX and XX (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

The Odyssey, besides being one of the world's first adventure stories, is a poem of great subtlety, rich in irony and sophisticated characterization. The poet's art is amply illustrated by books XIX and XX, in which Odysseus, disguised as a beggar, spends the night in his own palace and lays plans for his awesome revenge. Particularly memorable is the episode in which Penelope converses with her husband without suspecting his identity. In this edition, Richard Rutherford provides not only detailed comment on the action, characterization, and style of the books in question, but also, in an extensive introduction, a general survey of the Odyssey as a whole, laying special emphasis on the qualities of the second half of the poem. He also attempts to contribute to the literary criticism of the poem on a verbal level, by considering the poet's use of formulae, rhetorical technique, and similes. This volume is intended for readers of the Odyssey at all stages. The commentary gives extensive linguistic guidance for beginners; and the introduction, in which all Greek is translated, is intended to be accessible to any readers interested in Homer as a poet.

Brand: Cambridge University Press

Homer: Odyssey Books XVII-XVIII (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

Homer: Odyssey Books XVII-XVIII (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

Books XVII and XVIII of the Odyssey feature, among other episodes, the disguised Odysseus' penetration of his home after an absence of twenty years and his first encounter with his wife. The commentary provides linguistic and syntactical guidance suitable for upper-level students along with detailed consideration of Homer's compositional and narrative techniques, his literary artistry and the poem's central themes. An extensive introduction considers questions of formulaic composition, the nature of the poem's audience and the context of its performance, and isolates the concerns most prominent in the poem's second half and in Books XVII and XVIII in particular. Here too are considered the roles of Penelope and Telemachus, questions of disguise and recognition, and the institution of hospitality flaunted by the suitors in Odysseus' halls. Brief sections also discuss Homeric metre and the transmission of the text.

Brand: Cambridge University Press

Homer: Odyssey IX (Bcp Greek Texts)

Homer: Odyssey IX (Bcp Greek Texts)

This edition of one of the most enduringly popular and familiar books of the Odyssey - the encounter of Odysseus and his men with the cannibal Cyclops Polyphemos - grew out of the classes taken at the Joint Association of Classics Greek Summer School, where students who had completed a beginners' course were making their first acquaintance with Homeric verse. The complete text of the book, with generous narrative headings, and illustrations from Greek art, is complemented by a running vocabulary and translation assistance on facing pages. The brief introduction deals with the composition of the Homeric poems, with the story of the Odyssey as a whole and this book in particular. It considers the peculiarities of Homeric dialect forms and the scansion of hexameter verse. The book is ideal for all those tackling Homer for the first time, and is suitable for use in schools and upwards.

Brand: Bristol Classical Press

Homers Odyssey

Homers Odyssey

Homer's Odyssey is one of the greatest stories in literature, the epic tale of the return of Odysseus to his home following the Trojan war. After nine years of siege and fighting, the Greeks are finally returning home. But one of the Greek heroes, Odysseus, offends the Sea-God, who sends storms and waves to keep him from arriving home for ten years. In this thrilling story, we follow Odysseus's trials and adventures as he faces one danger after another on his long journey. In Isabel Wyatt's retelling of this magnificent adventure, we find all the wonderful storytelling skills for which she was famous. Ideal for Class 5-6 (age 10-12) in the Steiner-Waldorf curriculum.

Brand: Floris Books

The Odyssey

The Odyssey

The Odyssey By Homer

Brand: Homer & Simpson

Homer: Odyssey Books XIII and XIV (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

Homer: Odyssey Books XIII and XIV (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

The second part of the Odyssey takes epic in new directions, giving very significant roles to people of 'lower status' and their way of life: epic notions of the primacy of the aristocrat and of the achievements of the Trojan War are submitted to scrutiny. Books XIII-XIV contain some of the subtlest human exchanges in the poem, as Athena and Odysseus spar with each other and Odysseus tests the quiet patience of his swineherd Eumaeus. The principal themes and narrative structures, especially of disguise and recognition, which the second part uses with remarkable economy, are established here. The Introduction discusses these topics, and offers a detailed historical account of the Homeric dialect and remarks on metre; the Commentary pays particular attention to the exposition of unfamiliar linguistic forms and constructions. The literary parts of the Introduction and of the commentary are accessible to all.

Brand: Cambridge University Press

Homer: Odyssey Books XVII-XVIII (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

Homer: Odyssey Books XVII-XVIII (Cambridge Greek and Latin Classics)

Books XVII and XVIII of the Odyssey feature, among other episodes, the disguised Odysseus' penetration of his home after an absence of twenty years and his first encounter with his wife. The commentary provides linguistic and syntactical guidance suitable for upper-level students along with detailed consideration of Homer's compositional and narrative techniques, his literary artistry and the poem's central themes. An extensive introduction considers questions of formulaic composition, the nature of the poem's audience and the context of its performance, and isolates the concerns most prominent in the poem's second half and in Books XVII and XVIII in particular. Here too are considered the roles of Penelope and Telemachus, questions of disguise and recognition, and the institution of hospitality flaunted by the suitors in Odysseus' halls. Brief sections also discuss Homeric metre and the transmission of the text.

Brand: Cambridge University Press

An Odyssey Reader: Selections from Homer's Odyssey, Books 1-12

An Odyssey Reader: Selections from Homer's Odyssey, Books 1-12

Book by Draper, Pamela Ann

Brand: University of Michigan Press

A Complete Concordance to the Odyssey and Hymns of Homer: To Which Is Added a Concordance to the Parallel Passages in the Iliad, Odyssey and Hymns

A Complete Concordance to the Odyssey and Hymns of Homer: To Which Is Added a Concordance to the Parallel Passages in the Iliad, Odyssey and Hymns

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Brand: Nabu Press

Christianizing Homer: The Odyssey, Plato, and the Acts of Andrew

Christianizing Homer: The Odyssey, Plato, and the Acts of Andrew

This study focuses on the apocryphal Acts of Andrew (c. 200 CE), which purports to tell the story of the travels, miracles, and martyrdom of the apostle Andrew. Traditional scholarship has looked for the background of such writings in Jewish and Christian scriptures. MacDonald, however, breaks with that model and looks to classic literature for the sources of this story. Specifically, he argues that the Acts represent an attempt to transform Greco-Roman myth into Christian narrative categories by telling the story of Andrew in terms of Homeric epic, in particular the Odyssey. MacDonald presents a point-by-point comparison of the two works, finding the resemblances so strong, numerous, and tendentious that they virtually compel the reader to consider the Acts a transformative "rewriting" of the epic. This discovery not only sheds valuable light on the uses of Homer in the early church but also significantly contributes to our understanding of the reception of Homer in the empire as a whole.

Brand: Oxford University Press

The Odyssey of Homer

The Odyssey of Homer

The most eloquent translation of Homer's epic chronicle of the Greek hero Odysseus and his arduous journey home after the Trojan War

Brand: Harper Perennial Modern Classics

A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey: Volume I: Introduction and Books I-VIII

A Commentary on Homer's Odyssey: Volume I: Introduction and Books I-VIII

This first book of a three-volume commentary compiled by an international team of scholars includes an introduction discussing previous research on the Odyssey, its relation to the Iliad, the epic dialect, and the transmission of the text.

Brand: Oxford University Press

Sailing Home: Using the Wisdom of Homer's Odyssey to Navigate Life's Perils and Pitfalls

Sailing Home: Using the Wisdom of Homer's Odyssey to Navigate Life's Perils and Pitfalls

Homer?s Odyssey holds a timeless allure. It is an ancient story for every generation: the struggle of a man on a long and difficult voyage longing to return to love and family. Odysseus?s strivings to overcome both divine and earthly obstacles and to control his own impulsive nature hold valuable lessons for us as we confront the challenges of daily life. Sailing Home breathes fresh air into a classic we thought we knew, revealing its profound guidance for the modern seeker. Dividing the book into three parts Setting Forth, Disaster,? and? Return Fischer charts the course of Odysseus?s familiar wanderings. Readers come to see this ancient hero as a flawed human being who shares their own struggles and temptations, such as yielding to desire or fear or greed, and making peace with family. Featuring thoughtful meditations, illuminating anecdotes from Fischer?s and his students? lives, and stories from many wisdom traditions including Buddhist, Judaic, and Christian, Sailing Home shows the way to greater purpose in our own lives. The book?s literary dimension expands its appeal beyond the Buddhist market to a wider spiritual audience and to anyone interested in the teachings of myth and story.

Brand: North Atlantic Books

Travels with Odysseus: Uncommon Wisdom from Homer's Odyssey

Travels with Odysseus: Uncommon Wisdom from Homer's Odyssey

Travels with Odysseus retells the earthy and profound adventures of the Greek hero Odysseus as teaching stories which hold insight and guidance for our own present day journey. On his winding odyssey, Odysseus meets magical and powerful beings, who are not shy about meddling in his affairs. Some see him for who he really is and help him; they bring him wisdom and attainment, and unlock creative possibilities. Others, aggravating and difficult strangers, try to do him in: Odysseus gets sidetracked, enchanted, waylaid. Some truths he learns easily and others he resists. In all of this, Odysseus is not so different than the rest of us.

Brand: Circe's Island Press

Approaches to Teaching Homer's Iliad and Odyssey (Approaches to Teaching World Literature, 13)

Approaches to Teaching Homer's Iliad and Odyssey (Approaches to Teaching World Literature, 13)

Now at seventy-three volumes, this popular MLA series (ISSN 1059-1133) addresses a broad range of literary texts. Each volume surveys teaching aids and critical material and brings together essays that apply a variety of perspectives to teaching the text. Upper-level undergraduate and graduate students, student teachers, education specialists, and teachers in all humanities disciplines will find these volumes particularly helpful.

Brand: Modern Language Assn of Amer

Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey: A Biography (Books That Changed the World)

Homer's The Iliad and The Odyssey: A Biography (Books That Changed the World)

While it is unknown if there ever was a man named Homer, there is no doubt that the epic poems assembled under his name form the cornerstone of Western literature, feeding our imagination for over two and a half millennia. The Iliad and The Odyssey, with their tales of the Trojan War, Achilles, Ulysses and Penelope, the Sirens, the Cyclops, Helen of Troy, and the petulant gods, are familiar to most readers because they are so pervasive. From Plato to Virgil, Pope to Joyce, the poems have been told and retold, interpreted and embellished. In this graceful and sweeping book, Alberto Manguel traces the lineage of the poems from their inception and first recording. He considers the original purpose of the poems?either as allegory of philosophical truth or as a record of historical truth?surveys the challenges the pagan Homer presented to the early Christian world, and maps the spread of the works around the world and through the centuries. Manguel follows Homer through the greatest literature ever created and, above all, delights in the poems themselves.

Brand: Grove Press

Homer: An Introduction to the Iliad and the Odyssey (1898)

Homer: An Introduction to the Iliad and the Odyssey (1898)

Originally published in 1898. This volume from the Cornell University Library's print collections was scanned on an APT BookScan and converted to JPG 2000 format by Kirtas Technologies. All titles scanned cover to cover and pages may include marks notations and other marginalia present in the original volume.

Brand: Cornell University Library

The Odyssey of Homer: Translated by T.E. Lawrence

The Odyssey of Homer: Translated by T.E. Lawrence

Colonel T.E. Lawrence was one of the most flamboyant figures of his era, known throughout the Western world as Lawrence of Arabia. Glory-seeking yet self-effacing, this soldier, archaeologist, spy, and scholar was a war hero whom Winston Churchill called "one of the greatest men of our time." Less well known were his abilities as historian and author, which won him the admiration of such writers as Ezra Pound, W.H. Auden, and Robert Graves. While stationed on a desolate R.A.F. outpost on the fringes of the Karachi desert in India, Lawrence began his acclaimed translation of The Odyssey. He devoted himself to the project for four years, and during that time he came to feel that he was uniquely suited to the task. "I have hunted wild boars and watched wild lions," he wrote. "Built boats and killed many men. So I have odd knowledges that qualify me to understand The Odyssey, and odd experiences that interpret it to me." Relying on an innate sense of language and truly gifted abilities at translation, Lawrence transformed Homer's Odyssey into mellifluous prose. The result was an overnight bestseller. The New York Herald Tribune hailed it "perhaps the most interesting translation of the world's most interesting book," and The New York Times called it "ruggedly and roughly masculine" and added that it "gives a vividness to the story beyond any other text familiar to us." Lawrence breathes new life into the adventures of Odysseus, smoothing the reader's path through a fantastic array of monsters, temptresses, gods, and goddesses. For a generation of readers accustomed to verse translations of Homer, this bold and vivid prose version is well worth rediscovery.

Brand: Oxford University Press

Taking Her Seriously: Penelope and the Plot of Homer's Odyssey

Taking Her Seriously: Penelope and the Plot of Homer's Odyssey

[Heitman] provides a sensitive critical study of the Odyssey in which he strives to better appreciate the poem by focusing on the familial interactions in Ithaca. Heitman's interpretations. are unfailingly clear and thought-provoking. Highly recommended." - Choice "It is an example of a neat and valuable contribution which is both intelligible to non-specialists and inspiring for psychologists and classicists. It demonstrates that research into Homer still is. capable of extracting ever-new exciting ideas from Homer's texts." - Bryn Mawr Classical Review Taking Her Seriously is a reevaluation of Penelope, one of the most universally admired female characters in Western classical literature. Casting her in a new light, Richard Heitman emphasizes the courage, steadfastness, and integrity of this iconic figure while she faces potentially tragic decisions. Homer's treatment of events in Ithaca and the motivations of Penelope throughout the denser books of the Odyssey reveals a complicated, serious, independent, and insightful thinker whose actions are crucial to guaranteeing the well-being of her home and a safe future for her son, and for Odysseus as well. Through this thematic approach to the text, Penelope comes into focus as a loving wife whose role is far more important than passive fidelity to a wandering husband. Her integrity and wisdom in Odysseus' absence set the stage for his violent and triumphant return, and secure her place as a female role model in even the most modern of contexts. Richard Heitman is Assistant Professor of Classics and Philosophy at Carthage College.

Brand: University of Michigan Press

Homer's Odyssey 9-12: Greek Text with Facing Vocabulary and Commentary

Homer's Odyssey 9-12: Greek Text with Facing Vocabulary and Commentary

Facing each set of 20 lines from Books 9-12 of Thomas W. Allen's edition of Homer's Odyssey (originally published by Oxford University Press in 1908) is a single page of corresponding vocabulary and intermediate level grammatical commentary. Once readers have memorized the core vocabulary list, they will be able to read the Homeric Greek and consult all relevant vocabulary and commentary without turning a page.

Brand: Geoffrey Steadman

Homer's The Odyssey (Barron's Book Notes)

Homer's The Odyssey (Barron's Book Notes)

Plot synopsis of this classic is made meaningful with analysis and quotes by noted literary critics, summaries of the work's main themes and characters, a sketch of the author's life and times, a bibliography, suggested test questions, and ideas for essays and term papers.

Brand: Barron's Educational Series

The Shamanic Odyssey: Homer, Tolkien, and the Visionary Experience

The Shamanic Odyssey: Homer, Tolkien, and the Visionary Experience

Reveals the striking parallels between indigenous cultures of the Americas and the ancient Homeric world as well as Tolkien?s Middle Earth? Explores the shamanic use of healing songs, psychoactive plants, and vision quests at the heart of the Odyssey and the fantasy works of J.R.R. Tolkien? Examines Odysseus?s encounters with plant divinities, altered consciousness, animal shapeshifting, and sacred topography-all concepts vital to shamanism? Reveals how the Odyssey emerged precisely at the rupture between modern and primal consciousness Indigenous, shamanic ways of healing and prophecy are not foreign to the West. The native way of viewing the world-that is, understanding our cosmos as living, sentient, and interconnected-can be found hidden throughout Western literature, beginning with the very origin of the European literary tradition: Homer?s Odyssey. Weaving together the narrative traditions of the ancient Greeks and Celts, the mythopoetic work of J.R.R. Tolkien, and the voices of plant medicine healers in North and South America, the authors explore the use of healing songs, psychoactive plants, and vision quests at the heart of the Odyssey, The Lord of the Rings trilogy, and Tolkien?s final novella, Smith of Wootton Major. The authors examine Odysseus?s encounters with plant divinities, altered consciousness, animal shapeshifting, and sacred topography-all concepts vital to shamanism. They show the deep affinities between the healing powers of ancient bardic song and the icaros of the shamans of the Amazon rain forest, how Odysseus?s battle with Circe-wielder of narcotic plants and Mistress of Animals-follows the traditional method of negotiating with a plant ally, and how Odysseus?s journey to the land of the dead signifies the universal practice of the vision quest, a key part of shamanic initiation. Emerging precisely at the rupture between modern and primal consciousness, Homer?s work represents a window into the lost native mind of the Western world. In this way, the Odyssey as well as Tolkien?s work can be seen as an awakening and healing song to return us to our native minds and bring our disconnected souls back into harmony with the living cosmos.

Brand: Park Street Press

The Odyssey of Homer (Full Cast Audio Theater Adaptation)

The Odyssey of Homer (Full Cast Audio Theater Adaptation)

[Dramatized with Music, Sound and Performed by a Full Cast] [*Adapted and Directed by Yuri Rasovsky] When this groundbreaking serialized dramatization premiered on radio, critics were unanimous in their praise, calling it "a feast for the ears" and "a magnificent blend of scholarship and showmanship." It won numerous honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Pulitzer Prize of broadcasting. *Now, more than twenty years after its first airing, Blackstone Audio is pleased to present this outstanding production, dramatized here with intermittent discussions by classical scholars. - The ancient poem tells of a man, a hero of cunning rather than brawn, who inhabits three worlds: the world of his own reality, the world of the gods and demigods, and the world of magic and monsters. The interweaving of these three worlds contributes significantly to the delight that The Odyssey has inspired throughout the ages. Odysseus is a man who inhabits three worlds: the world of his own reality, the world of the gods, and the world of magic and monsters. This award-winning dramatization blends exciting action and rich poetry with discussions by classical scholars.

Brand: Blackstone Audio

Homer's The Odyssey (Christian Guides to the Classics)

Homer's The Odyssey (Christian Guides to the Classics)

We?ve all heard about the classics and assume they?re great. Some of us have even read them on our own. But for those of us who remain a bit intimidated or simply want to get more out of our reading, Crossway?s Christian Guides to the Classics are here to help. In these short guidebooks, popular professor, author, and literary expert Leland Ryken takes you through some of the greatest literature in history while answering your questions along the way. Each book: Includes an introduction to the author and work Explains the cultural context Incorporates published criticism Contains discussion questions at the end of each unit of the text Defines key literary terms Lists resources for further study Evaluates the classic text from a Christian worldview This guide opens up Homer?s The Odyssey and highlights the universal themes of endurance and longing for rest as displayed in this epic tale of a man trying to find his way home.

Brand: Crossway

The Unknown Odysseus: Alternate Worlds in Homer's Odyssey

The Unknown Odysseus: Alternate Worlds in Homer's Odyssey

The Unknown Odysseus is a study of how Homer creates two versions of his hero, one who is the triumphant protagonist of the revenge plot and another, more subversive, anonymous figure whose various personae exemplify an entirely different set of assumptions about the world through which each hero moves and about the shape and meaning of human life. Separating the two perspectives allows us to see more clearly how the poem's dual focus can begin to explain some of the notorious difficulties readers have encountered in thinking about the Odyssey. In The Unknown Odysseus, Thomas Van Nortwick offers the most complete exploration to date of the implications of Odysseus' divided nature, showing how it allows Homer to explore the riddles of human identity in a profound way that is not usually recognized by studies focusing on only one "real" hero in the narrative. This new perspective on the epic enriches the world of the poem in a way that will interest both general readers and classical scholars. ". an elegant and lucid critical study that is also a good introduction to the poem." -David Quint, London Review of Books "Thomas Van Nortwick's eloquently written book will give the neophyte a clear interpretive path through the epic while reminding experienced readers why they should still care about the Odyssey 's unresolved interpretive cruces. The Unknown Odysseus is not merely accessible, but a true pleasure to read." -Lillian Doherty, University of Maryland "Contributing to an important new perspective on understanding the epic, Thomas Van Nortwick wishes to resist the dominant, even imperial narrative that tries so hard to trick, beguile, and even bully its listeners into accepting the inevitability of Odysseus' heroism." -Victoria Pedrick, Georgetown University Thomas Van Nortwick is Nathan A. Greenberg Professor of Classics at Oberlin College and author of Somewhere I Have Never Travelled: The Second Self and the Hero's Journey in Ancient Epic (1992) and Oedipus: The Meaning of a Masculine Life (1998). Jacket art: Head of Odysseus from a sculptural group representing Odysseus killing Polyphemus in the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Sperlonga, Italy. Photograph by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Brand: University of Michigan Press

Homer and the Odyssey

Homer and the Odyssey

Who was Homer? This book takes us beyond the legends of the blind bard or the wandering poet to explore an author about whom nothing is known, except for his works. It offers a reading of the ancient biographies as clues to the reception of the Homeric poems in Antiquity and provides an introduction to the oral tradition which lay at the source of the Homeric epics. Above all, it takes us into the world of the Odyssey, a world that lies between history and fiction. It guides the reader through a poem which rivals the modern novel in its complexity, demonstrating the unity of the poem as a whole. It defines the many and varied figures of otherness by which the Greeks of the archaic period defined themselves and underlines the values promoted by the poem's depictions of men, women, and gods. Finally, it asks why, throughout the centuries from Homer to Kazantzakis and Joyce, the hero who never forgets his homeland and dreams constantly of return has never ceased to be the incarnation of what it is to be human. This translation is a revised and much expanded version of the original French text, and includes a new chapter on the representation of women in the Odyssey and an updated bibliography.

Brand: Oxford University Press

Odysseus, Hero of Practical Intelligence: Deliberation and Signs in Homer's Odyssey

Odysseus, Hero of Practical Intelligence: Deliberation and Signs in Homer's Odyssey

In dramatic representations and narrative reports of inner deliberation the Odyssey displays the workings of the human mind and its hero's practical intelligence, epitomized by anticipating consequences and controlling his actions accordingly. Once his hope of returning home as husband, father and king is renewed on Calypso's isle, Odysseus shows a consistent will to focus on this purpose and subordinate other impulses to it. His fabled cleverness is now fully engaged in a gradually emerging plan, as he thinks back from that final goal through a network of means to achieve it. He relies on "signs"? inferences in the form "if this, then that" as defined by the Stoic Chrysippus? and the nature of his intelligence is thematically underscored through contrast with others' recklessness, that is, failure to heed signs or reckon consequences. In Homeric deliberation, the mind is torn between competing options or intentions, not between "reason" and "desire." The lack of distinct opposing faculties and hierarchical organization in the Homeric mind, far from archaic simplicity, prefigures the psychology of Chrysippus, who cites deliberation scenes from the Odyssey against Plato's hierarchical tri-partite model. From the Stoics, there follows a psychological tradition leading through Hobbes and Leibniz, to Peirce and Dewey. These thinkers are drawn upon to show the significance of the conception of "thinking" first articulated in the Odyssey. Homer's work inaugurates an approach that has provoked philosophical conflict persisting into the present, and opposition to pragmatism and Pragmatism can be discerned in prominent critiques of Homer and his hero which are analyzed and countered in this study.

Brand: UPA

Homer: The Odyssey (Landmarks of World Literature (New))

Homer: The Odyssey (Landmarks of World Literature (New))

This handy guide to The Odyssey introduces students to a text which has been fundamental to literature for nearly 3,000 years. Providing a summary of the poem and examining its structure, Jasper Griffin clearly outlines the unity, values and techniques of the poem, as well as the reasons for its longstanding appeal. Students will discover the essential themes of loyalty and betrayal, and will be guided through the narrative of Odysseus' adventures, in addition to a helpful guide to further reading. First Edition Hb (1987): 0-521-32804-7 First Edition Pb (1987): 0-521-31043-1

Brand: Cambridge University Press

The Odyssey: A Dramatic Retelling of Homer's Epic

The Odyssey: A Dramatic Retelling of Homer's Epic

Armitage has given an ageless story new vigor, and has done it with style, wit and elegance."? Literary Review In this new verse adaptation, originally commissioned for BBC radio, Simon Armitage has recast Homer's epic as a series of bristling dramatic dialogues: between gods and men; between no-nonsense Captain Odysseus and his unruly, lotus-eating, homesick companions; and between subtle Odysseus (wiliest hero of antiquity) and a range of shape-shifting adversaries?Calypso, Circe, the Sirens, the Cyclops?as he and his men are "pinballed between islands" of adversity. One of the most individual voices of his generation, Armitage revitalizes our sense of the Odyssey as oral poetry, as indeed one of the greatest of tall tales.

Brand: W.W. Norton & Company

A Penelopean Poetics, Reweaving the Feminine in Homer's Odyssey

A Penelopean Poetics, Reweaving the Feminine in Homer's Odyssey

A Penelopean Poetics looks at the relationship between gender ideology and the self-referential poetics of the Odyssey through the figure of Penelope. She is a cunning story-teller; her repeated reweavings of Laertes' shroud a figurative replication of the process of oral poetic composition itself. Penelope's web is thus a discourse and it can be construed specifically as feminine. Her gendered poetics celebrates process, multiplicity, and ambiguity and it resists phallocentric discourse by undermining stable and fixed meanings. Penelope's poetics become a discursive thread through which different feminine voices can realize their resistant capacities. Author Barbara Clayton's work contributes to discussions in the classics as well as literary criticism, sex and gender studies, and women's studies.

Brand: Lexington Books

Homer's Odyssey (Oxford Readings in Classical Studies)

Homer's Odyssey (Oxford Readings in Classical Studies)

This volume assembles sixteen authoritative articles on Homer's Odyssey that have appeared over the last thirty years. A wide variety of interpretative strategies are represented, including, in addition to traditional close readings, the approaches of comparative anthropology, narratology, feminism, and audience-oriented criticism. Papers have been selected for their clarity and accessibility, and each is informed by close attention to philological and textual detail. A full glossary and list of abbreviations have been included, and a specially written introduction puts the selections in a wider context by giving an overview of major strands in the interpretation of Homer in the second half of the twentieth century.

Brand: Oxford University Press

The Odyssey of Homer

The Odyssey of Homer

The Odyssey is the sequel to the Illiad in which the Greek hero Odysseus has many adventures in his travels. After the fall of Troy Ulysses (the name the Roman's gave Odysseus) returns to Ithica. During the nine years of the Trojan War and the subsequent eleven years it takes Odysseus to return home, his wife Penelope has to deal with a group of disruptive suitors.

Brand: Book Jungle

Homer Box Set: Iliad and Odyssey: Classic Collection

Homer Box Set: Iliad and Odyssey: Classic Collection

To the ancient world, the Iliad and the Odyssey were history, myth, religion and poetry; so too for modern scholars, they are invaluable resources for anthropological, psychological, and even philosophical speculations. But ancient epics raison d tre was to tell a story. And of all the worlds great stories, perhaps none is richer, none more exciting, none more enduring than the Odyssey.

Brand: Blackstone Audiobooks, Inc.

Homer and the Odyssey

Homer and the Odyssey

Who was Homer? This book takes us beyond the legends of the blind bard or the wandering poet to explore an author about whom nothing is known, except for his works. It offers a reading of the ancient biographies as clues to the reception of the Homeric poems in Antiquity and provides an introduction to the oral tradition which lay at the source of the Homeric epics. Above all, it takes us into the world of the Odyssey, a world that lies between history and fiction. It guides the reader through a poem which rivals the modern novel in its complexity, demonstrating the unity of the poem as a whole. It defines the many and varied figures of otherness by which the Greeks of the archaic period defined themselves and underlines the values promoted by the poem's depictions of men, women, and gods. Finally, it asks why, throughout the centuries from Homer to Kazantzakis and Joyce, the hero who never forgets his homeland and dreams constantly of return has never ceased to be the incarnation of what it is to be human. This translation is a revised and much expanded version of the original French text, and includes a new chapter on the representation of women in the Odyssey and an updated bibliography.

Brand: Oxford University Press

The Return of Ulysses: A Cultural History of Homer's Odyssey

The Return of Ulysses: A Cultural History of Homer's Odyssey

This broadly conceived and enlightening look at how Homer?s Odyssey has resonated in the West offers a thematic analysis of the poem?s impact on social and political ideas, institutions, and mores from the ancient world through the present day. Proving that the epic poem is timeless, Edith Hall identifies fifteen key themes in the Odyssey and uses them to illustrate the extensive and diverse effect that Homer?s work has had on all manner of inquiry, expression, and art. She traces the text?s pervasive thread of influence from the tragedies of classical Athens and the burlesque of Aristophanes to its contemporary artistic reinterpretations in literature, theatre, opera, popular music, film, and science fiction. In considering the mark of the Odyssey on the modern global world, Hall looks at how the poem affected colonialism and the frontier mentality in the American West, how it engendered contemporary attitudes toward sex, death, war, philosophy, violence, and race, and the ways in which the Odyssey forms the backbone of modern-day psychology. Accessibly written and timely, The Return of Ulysses establishes the Odyssey as the founding text of Western Civilization and offers a major contribution to the study of Homer?s epic poem, as well as modern insight into its cultural reception and continuing imprint on society.

Brand: Johns Hopkins University Press

Homer's Odyssey and the Near East

Homer's Odyssey and the Near East

The Odyssey's larger plot is composed of a number of distinct genres of myth, all of which are extant in various Near Eastern cultures (Mesopotamian, West Semitic, Egyptian). Unexpectedly, the Near Eastern culture with which the Odyssey has the most parallels is the Old Testament. Consideration of how much of the Odyssey focuses on non-heroic episodes - hosts receiving guests, a king disguised as a beggar, recognition scenes between long-separated family members - reaffirms the Odyssey's parallels with the Bible. In particular the book argues that the Odyssey is in a dialogic relationship with Genesis, which features the same three types of myth that comprise the majority of the Odyssey: theoxeny, romance (Joseph in Egypt), and Argonautic myth (Jacob winning Rachel from Laban). The Odyssey also offers intriguing parallels to the Book of Jonah, and Odysseus' treatment by the suitors offers close parallels to the Gospels' depiction of Christ in Jerusalem.

Brand: Cambridge University Press

The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales: The Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Migration of Myth

The Baltic Origins of Homer's Epic Tales: The Iliad, the Odyssey, and the Migration of Myth

Compelling evidence that the events of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey took place in the Baltic and not the Mediterranean? Reveals how a climate change forced the migration of a people and their myth to ancient Greece? Identifies the true geographic sites of Troy and Ithaca in the Baltic Sea and Calypso's Isle in the North Atlantic Ocean For years scholars have debated the incongruities in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, given that his descriptions are at odds with the geography of the areas he purportedly describes. Inspired by Plutarch's remark that Calypso's Isle was only five days sailing from Britain, Felice Vinci convincingly argues that Homer's epic tales originated not in the Mediterranean, but in the northern Baltic Sea. Using meticulous geographical analysis, Vinci shows that many Homeric places, such as Troy and Ithaca, can still be identified in the geographic landscape of the Baltic. He explains how the dense, foggy weather described by Ulysses befits northern not Mediterranean climes, and how battles lasting through the night would easily have been possible in the long days of the Baltic summer. Vinci's meteorological analysis reveals how a decline of the "climatic optimum" caused the blond seafarers to migrate south to warmer climates, where they rebuilt their original world in the Mediterranean. Through many generations the memory of the heroic age and the feats performed by their ancestors in their lost homeland was preserved and handed down to the following ages, only later to be codified by Homer in the Iliad and the Odyssey. Felice Vinci offers a key to open many doors that allow us to consider the age-old question of the Indo-European diaspora and the origin of the Greek civilization from a new perspective.

Brand: Inner Traditions

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